Acura nsx 2005

2005 Acura NSX

by

Anonymous

The Japanese, legendary sword craftsmen, have continued to perfect their metal craft substituting automobiles for swords. In 1990, Acura combined the two crafts into the NSX producing the samurai sword of the sports car world.

Since its beginning, the NSX had only one powertrain upgrade. In its last year, it was powered by a mid-engined 3.2-liter V6 producing 290-hp mated to a six-speed manual; the automatic version kept its previous 3.0-liter V6. Yet, these were not your ordinary V6s. They represented automotive firsts: first engines with VTEC â?? Variable valve Timing and lift Electronic Control, first with variable-volume intake manifolds, and first with titanium connecting rods — good enough for five second 0-60 jumps.

Acura worked in aluminum to craft an all-aluminum unit body structure, body panels, suspension, and engine. The suspension features racecar-like double wishbones at each corner. Once again, they achieved a number of automotive firsts in the carâ??s construction.

The NSX handles the road like a samurai sword — fast and precise. Reviewers praised its balanced ride and cornering, fixating on the wail of the VTEC V6 scaling its 8000-rpm redline. The brakes are large, ventilated four-wheel discs incorporated into an advanced 4-channel ABS that includes a traction control system. Much of Hondaâ??s Formula 1 experience found its way into the NSX. Yet, uniquely a Honda product, in city driving the NSX seems as meek as a Honda sedan.

The craftsmanship of the interior rivals the mechanicals, but only those under six-feet should apply. Steering and shifting have that samurai sword quality â?? direct and precise. Hand-stitched leather abounds in a cockpit that reminded some reviewers of a fighter jet with its excellent visibility and ergonomic control placement.

Yet, with all its innovation and craftsmanship, the NSX was not a sales success. Over the fifteen years of its existence, Acura only managed to sell 8,854 NSXs in the U.S. Chevrolet sells three times that number of Corvettes in one year. High price, almost $90,000, less supercar power than the competition, and the first Japanese sports car at this level all combined to dampen the market. Not everyone appreciates a samurai sword.

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Synopsis

Powered by an all-aluminum V6 engine, featuring Honda’s VTEC system. The NSX was produced from 1990-2005. The NSX was the first production car to feature an aluminum body, and an aluminum alloy frame and suspension. The NSX was originally designed to compete with Ferrari’s 328, and to offer consumers a more affordable taste of mid-engine performance.

The 2005 Acura NSX features a 3.2L V6, which produces 290 horsepower and 225 lb-ft torque. The 2005 NSX is part of the second generation (2002-2005) of Honda’s NSX line. The second generation NSX featured xenon HID headlights, in place of the pop-up halogen headlamps of earlier models. In addition, the second generation featured slightly wider tires to complement a revised suspension, which makes for a very forgiving vehicle on the track, even for a less experienced driver.

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New and Used NSX Prices, Acura NSX Model Years and History

2020 Acura NSX

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2019 Acura NSX

The NSX is a two-door, high-performance sports coupe by Acura.

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2018 Acura NSX

The NSX comes with a refreshed design for 2018 and a hybrid engine that delivers ample power.

5

Overall

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2017 Acura NSX

Acura’s wildly designed NSX is a speed demon that doesn’t compromise on luxury, agility or performance.

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3.9

Overall

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2005 Acura NSX

The 2005 Acura NSX is a two-door sports car with seating for two passengers and is offered in two trims; a 252 hp with an automatic or a 290 hp with a manual transmission.

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2004 Acura NSX

A high-performance two-passenger, two-door sports coupe, the 2004 Acura NSX adds keyless entry this year and comes standard with a 290 hp 3.2L V6 paired with a six-speed manual transmission.

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2003 Acura NSX

A popular enthusiast sports car, the 2003 Acura NSX sports a 3.0-liter V6 engine that produces 252 hp and 210 lb-ft of torque.

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2002 Acura NSX

A high-performance two-passenger sports car, the exotic 2002 Acura NSX is available with an automatic trans and a 252 hp engine or a manual transmission with 290 hp.

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2001 Acura NSX

A two-passenger high-performance sports car, the 2001 Acura NSX is available with a 252 hp V6 when paired with an automatic transmission or a 290 hp V6 when linked to the manual.

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2000 Acura NSX

The 2000 Acura NSX is a two-passenger, high-performance sports car that is available as a hardtop coupe or a targa.

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Throughout the existence of the Acura NSX, it has been a supercar that has stood out as a flamboyant exotic vehicle. A highly-distinctive performance addition to the Acura line-up in 1991, the NSX was instantly noted for its speed and technological prowess. The early Acura NSX was noted for extensive aluminum construction for the chassis and body as well as for the introduction of Honda’s VTEC (Variable Valve Timing and Lift Electronic Control) engine technology to the United States. Originally a hardtop, the NSX supercar later adopted a targa top removable roof panel in 1995. In 2002, the Acura NSX received another major change with a revision that most notably resulted in the fixed HID headlights. Production of the first generation Acura NSX concluded in 2005 but the appetite for the supercar remained strong enough to encourage a new model for the 2017 model. Powered by a Sport Hybrid Super Handling All-Wheel Drive system permitting a maximum 573 horsepower from twin-turbocharged gasoline engine and two electric motors, the second generation Acura NSX also touts other advanced technologies found in a new supercar era such as a 9-speed dual clutch transmission.

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Statistics

Speed 6.2

Accel 5.2

Braking 4.5

Corner 4.5

Base Rarity 5.0

B3

Unlock Requirements

North America:
missing data
Rarity: ?
Europe:
missing data
Rarity: ?
Asia:
missing data
Rarity: ?

Performance

Speed:
Top Speed: missing data

Acceleration:
0-60 mph (0-97 km/h): missing data

0-100 mph (0-161 km/h): missing data

Braking:

120-0 mph (193-0 km/h): missing data

 
Lateral Gs:
60 mph (97 km/h): missing data

 

Speed 5.9

Acceleration 4.0

Braking 4.2

Handling 4.5

Base Rarity 6.2

B 592

Unlock Requirements

North America:
missing data
Rarity: ?
Europe:
missing data
Rarity: ?
Asia:
Reach level 21 to unlock this car for purchase in the dealership. for 75,500 CR.
Rarity: 6.2

Performance & Body Style

Body Style:
Coupé

Speed:
Top Speed: missing data

Acceleration:
0-60 mph (0-97 km/h): missing data

0-100 mph (0-161 km/h): missing data

Braking:

60-0 mph (97-0 km/h): missing data

100-0 mph (161-0 km/h): missing data

Lateral Gs:
60 mph (97 km/h): missing data

120 mph (193 km/h): missing data

Speed 6.6

Handling 5.5

Acceleration 5.3

Launch 5.6

Braking 5.2

C 412

Unlock Requirements

Car Dealer:
Purchase from the car dealer for 60,000 CR

Performance & Body Style

Body Style:
Coupé

Speed:
Top Speed: 179.7 mph  (289.1 km/h)

Acceleration:
0-60 mph (0-97 km/h): 4.982 secs.
0-100 mph (0-161 km/h): 12.017 secs.
Braking:

60-0 mph (97-0 km/h): 124.2 ft (37.9 m)
100-0 mph (161-0 km/h): 334.6 ft (102 m)
Lateral Gs:
60 mph (97 km/h): 1.02 g
120 mph (193 km/h): 1.01 g

Speed 7.0

Handling 5.2

Acceleration 7.0

Launch 7.1

Braking 5.1

B 476

Unlock Requirements

Car Dealer:
Purchase from the car dealer for 64,000 CR

Performance & Body Style

Body Style:
Sports Car

Speed:
Top Speed: 179.8 mph  (289.3 km/h)

Acceleration:
0-60 mph (0-97 km/h): 5.000 secs.
0-100 mph (0-161 km/h): 12.000 secs.
Braking:

60-0 mph (97-0 km/h): 124.8 ft (38 m)
100-0 mph (161-0 km/h): 337.1 ft (102.7 m)
Lateral Gs:
60 mph (97 km/h): 0.90 g
120 mph (193 km/h): 0.89 g

This is what happened when Honda decided to bring some of its racing magic into their showrooms.

Name: Acura NSX (US) / Honda NSX (rest of the world)Debut: 1989 Chicago Auto ShowEngine: 3.0-Liter V6Specs: 270 Horsepower / 210 Pound-FeetPrice: $60,000 ($110,000 in 2019)

By the mid 1980s Honda, already the owner of a fine pedigree in motorcycle racing, was making a name for itself as a supplier of F1 engines and wanted some of that magic in its showrooms. The mid-engine 1984 Honda HP-X concept car designed by Pininfarina was its first effort to that end, but it wasn’t until the arrival of the Honda NSX in 1990, that the company fulfilled its wishes.

Meanwhile in the United States, the Japanese manufactures had already made clear that they were not a temporary fad. Honda and Toyota were kings among them, with their economy sedans Accord and Camry climbing fast through the best sellers’ ranks. There were still plenty of lucrative spaces to explore, like premium automobiles and pickup trucks. Honda, Nissan and Toyota decided simultaneously to address the former first, establishing each their own luxury channel. Honda`s Acura was the first to arrive in 1986, followed by Lexus and Infiniti, from Toyota and Nissan respectively, in 1989. 

Honda saw Acura as the ideal channel to distribute their new supercar in America. The mid-engine NSX, considered a legitimate competitor of Porsches and Ferraris, would have felt out of place in a showroom full of Civics and Accords, and thus the decision was made to rename the car Acura NSX for the American public.

The NSX was powered by a 3.0-liter VTEC V6, capable of 270 horsepower and 210 lbs.-ft of torque, placed behind its only two seats. The power was transferred to the rear wheels by a 6-speed manual gear box. The development of its chassis and suspension was heavily influenced by the input given by Ayrton Senna, who had won the F1 drivers world championship in 1988 on McLaren cars powered by Honda, and would also win the title in 1990 and 1991 for the same team, before his untimely death in 1994 on board of a non-Honda product. The NSX owners would also enjoy the benefits of revolutionary safety technologies like ABS brakes and traction control, which would make them feel and appear better drivers that they would have a legitimate right to claim to be.

Although the NSX was shown to the world for the first time in the Chicago Auto Show in February 1989, its sales started first in Japan in January of 1990, and wouldn’t being in America until November that year. The car was well received by the public and specialized media alike. Road & Track recorded a 0 to 60 miles per hour sprint of 5.7 seconds, reaching the quarter mile in 14 seconds, prompting them to say that the Acura NSX «deserves a place in the stratospheric performance league of sports/GT cars.» They weren’t kidding, with also 270 hp on tap, the Ferrari 328 GTB that Honda benchmarked for the NSX development, ran from 0 to 60 mph only two tenth of a second faster.

The NSX was an outstanding beauty. Harmoniously flowing lines enhanced its low profile rising toward its rear into a magnificent built in spoiler, that would not only keep the car firmly planted in the pavement, but also made sure that none of the drivers left behind would confuse it for anything else. Hidden pop-up headlight gave it a very European stance, while side vents kept the brakes, engine and looks super cool.

Honda gave the NSX a Targa top in 1995 and upgraded the engine with a 3.2-liter VTEC V6 good for 290 hp and 294 lb.-ft of torque in 1997. 2002 brought about a significant facelift that made all NSXs sold in America targa models and replaced the pop-up headlights with open bi-xenon units, that sacrificed some if the flair of the original design in the altar of pedestrian safety and better road illumination.

The first-generation Acura NSX bowed after the 2005 model year, and wasn’t replaced until 2016, when the much-awaited new generation of the supercar finally arrived. But that’s a supercar for another Sunday.

Convenience

Cruise Control

Standard

Standard

Adaptive Cruise Control

Not available

Available

Compass

Not available

Standard

Illuminated Vanity Mirrors

Not available

Driver and passenger

Steering Wheel Material

Leather

Leather/genuine wood

Gear Shift Knob Trim

Leather

Leather

Tilt/Telescoping Steering Column

Standard

Standard

Clock

In-dash

In-dash

12-Volt DC Power Outlet

1

1

Retained Accessory Power

Standard

Standard

Dome Light

Fade

Fade

Glovebox Light

Standard

Standard

Map Light

Not available

Front

Cargo Light

Standard

Standard

Cupholders

Front

Front

Programmable Garage-Door Opener

Not available

Standard

Voice Recorder

Not available

Not available

Tire Mobility Kit

Not available

Not available

Rearview Mirror

Day-night

Auto-dimming day-night

Rear Window Defogger

Standard

Standard

Floor Mats

Carpet front

Carpet front

USB Ports

Not available

Not available

Hands Free Auto-Opening Liftgate/Trunk

Not available

Not available

Specifications

Length

174.2 «

187.4 «

Wheelbase

99.6 «

101.9 «

Front Track

59.5 «

59.2 «

Rear Track

60.7 «

59.0 «

Width

71.3 «

72.0 «

Turning Radius

19.0 ‘

18.1 ‘

Height

46.1 «

50.3 «

Horsepower

252 @ 6,600 rpm

390 @ 6,100 rpm

Torque

210 @ 5,300 rpm

399 @ 3,500 rpm

Fuel Tank Capacity

18.5 gal.

19.9 gal.

Bore and Stroke

3.54 / 3.07 »

3.39 / 3.56 »

Drag Coefficient

.30

.34

Curb Weight

3,197 lbs.

3,785 lbs.

Gross Vehicle Weight Rating

Not available

Not available

Maximum Trailer Weight

Not available

Not available

Passenger Volume

49 cu.ft.

Not available

Front Legroom

44.3 «

43.0 «

Front Headroom

36.3 «

37.4 «

Front Hip Room

53.8 «

Not available

Front Shoulder Room

52.5 «

55.2 «

Rear Legroom

Not available

23.7 «

Rear Headroom

Not available

33.3 «

Rear Hip Room

Not available

Not available

Rear Shoulder Room

Not available

51.5 «

Maximum Luggage Volume

5.0 cu.ft.

11.5 cu.ft.

Interior Cargo Volume

5.0 cu.ft.

11.5 cu.ft.

Interior Cargo Volume Seats Folded

Not available

Not available

Maximum Interior Cargo Volume

5.0 cu.ft.

11.5 cu.ft.

Performance

The NSX accelerates quickly with the aid of the short gears and healthy torque curve. Like it’s predecessor, the 1997 Acura NSX, gear placement is critical when accelerating, with best results coming in above 5500 RPMs.

Grip is immense, with oversteer occuring less frequently than it’s younger brother, thanks to a revised rear suspension and wider tires. However, this softer rear suspension does result in a decreased turn in ability than it’s predecessor, and is therefore less able to take slower corners as efficiently as the 1997 Acura NSX.

Braking is sufficient, but sometimes requires early braking in order to increase turn in. Sometimes, oversteer can occur if the brakes are applied in the middle of cornering.

The car likes to be launched at 4000 RPMs on normal tracks, and off the rev limiter at the Sedona Raceway Park Drag Strips.

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